Michigan Teen Receives New Car From Fellow Co-Workers

Due to the generosity of his co-workers, Noah Robinson had a birthday he will never forget.

Robinson, a 19-year old Michigan resident, works in the shipping department at Glastender in Saginaw County, Michigan. His co-workers wanted to give back and show him how much he is appreciated at the company.

Not only has Robinson shown his dedication by doing a good job, but he’s shown dedication in making it to work every day, rain or shine. Robinson didn’t have a car, and therefore had to bike 46 minutes to work every day. He’s been making the trip since this summer.

“Six-and-a-half miles one way. Rain, sleet, shine, whatever it was, he was riding his bike, and he was here on time all the time. It just turned into, ‘We could probably do something to help him out,'” said Dan McGrandy, an engineering tech at Glastender.

Cycling at a speed of 10 miles per hour, for an hour, can burn up to 260 calories. But while it’s a healthy way to get to work, how many young people would be willing to bike 6.5 miles in the rain every day to get to work?

When Glastender’s owner found out Robinson didn’t have his license at the age of 18, he took him out to practice driving, and eventually took him to take his road test. Robinson recently just passed his driver’s test.

After passing his test, right before his 19th birthday, his co-workers told him they’d been working on a surprise for him.

Dozens of Glastender employees put together their money to buy an Oldsmobile Alero for the young man. They wanted to show him they noticed him doing his best to start a life, in spite of facing a few challenges along the way. While 43% of people have to finance their vehicle, Robinson’s co-workers paid for the car in full, plus a year’s worth of insurance.

Robinson commented on this act of kindness, showing him what it means to have a “family”.

Fortunately for Michigan residents, Glastender isn’t the only caring organization within the community.

The fourth annual Sleep Out America recently took place, consisting of fifty business leaders sleeping outside in cardboard boxes in order to raise awareness and funds. In its fourth year, Sleep Out America has raised more than $1 million for the 60,000 homeless children in Michigan, said Covenant House Michigan Executive Director Gerry Piro.

For participants, the night could prove to be quite challenging. Temperatures were expected to be about 40 degrees when the executives retreated to their boxes, and dropped as low as 29 before the end of the event at five a.m.

Guests were invited for a public candlelight vigil before the executive began their night. Piro said Detroit was one of the many Sleep Out events across the country, with fifty other sleep outs taking place in Michigan.

In the past five years, Michigan has seen a 9% decrease in homelessness. And unfortunately, homelessness is a nation-wide problem.

With less than one in four Americans having enough money saved up to cover at least six months of expenses, if disaster strikes, most people are not prepared.

According to a recent report, homeless families are typically single women with young children or seniors over the age of 55. Programs across Michigan, and the rest of the states, are being formed to provide assistance to those who need it most.

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