Father, son awarded ‘Quilts of Valor’

Margaret Rosenbrook, a volunteer with Quilts of Valor, presented WWII veteran George Crisp and Vietnam veteran Danny Crisp each with a handmade quilt to thank both men for their sacrifices in serving the country. The quilts were made by volunteers in Brighton, Michigan.

Margaret Rosenbrook, a volunteer with Quilts of Valor, presented WWII veteran George Crisp and Vietnam veteran Danny Crisp each with a handmade quilt to thank both men for their sacrifices in serving the country. The quilts were made by volunteers in Brighton, Michigan.

By Pat Maurer
Correspondent

A father and son, both veterans, were each given a “Quilt of Valor” in a special ceremony at the Clare/Farwell American Legion Monday afternoon.
George Edward Crisp, 91, served with the 38th Infantry in the Army during World War II at Normandy on D Day, and Calvary Armored Recognizance in the Battle of the Bulge and in Germany and in Germany, France and Czechoslovakia. He was wounded twice at Normandy and once at the Battle of the Bulge, hit by rifle fire in the arm, throat, lungs and stomach. His foot was injured when he stepped on a booby-trap at the Battle of the Bulge. “After that I drove a tank,” he said. “I was in for two years, eight months and six days. I wanted to re-enlist but they wouldn’t let me.”

He said because of his injuries, over the years he has accumulated five years of hospital time from the injuries.
George said he grew up in the Upper Peninsula, lived on Drummond Island, worked on a ship, the Cornell, on the Great Lakes then lived in Flint and finally moved to the Farwell area in 1991.

His son Danny was in the Marine Corps from 1969 to 1971 during the Vietnam era. He served with the Second Marine Division – Weapons Repair at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. He also now lives at Lake George.

The handmade quilts were presented to the two veterans by Margaret Rosenbrook, a volunteer with the Quilts of Valor Foundation, a national organization “founded in 2003 by “Blue Star” mom Catherine Roberts, who had a son deployed in Iraq. In a dream she saw a post-deployment warrior struggling with his war demons … sitting on the side of his bed, wrapped in a quilt which comforted him. From this vision, Quilts of Valor Foundation had its beginning.”

Today the organization is a grassroots group of quilters from all across the United States, who come together to honor service members and veterans. During the presentation, Rosenbrook said, “We honor you for your service in World War II and Vietnam. For leaving all you hold dear and to stand in harm’s way in a time of crisis, protecting us from the effects of war. We know that freedom is not free. The cost of our freedom is the dedication of lives of men and women like you, and this quilt is meant to say ‘thank you’ for your sacrifice and to offer comfort to you and remind you that you are forever in our hearts.”
She said the two quilts presented Monday were made by a group of ladies from Brighton Michigan.

George’s granddaughter, and Danny’s daughter Clarissa Crisp-Uelsmann said she was approached during a parade in Clawson by members of the organization who told her that the last World War II Veteran from that city had died, and asked her about other WWII vets. She said she was happy to tell them about her father and grandfather.

Share This Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Current day month ye@r *